Sunday, September 25, 2016

Positive Spin on Autism 2

http://www.npr.org/2016/07/15/486009997/from-father-to-father-a-few-words-of-wisdom-on-raising-kids-with-autism

Here's another positive spin on autism. Reading this article in the link above you will realize just hos widespread the issue of parents having to deal with autistic children is. A father is asked about how he deals with his son who has autism. The answers that the father gives in this article are telling for all the right reasons. It is going to be a work in progress no matter how you tackle this issue.

Though there are challenges, the father has remained loyal to his son and sticks by his son. A father's love for his son is something so invaluable that it should never be taken away.  Charles Jones handles autistic related issues the right way. He has every right to worry about his son Malik, and he will have to teach Malik that there are some things he has to pull away from doing, such as the hard flapping of hands when he gets excited. However, it's the reassurance from both the father and the son that everything is going to be okay that makes this article stand out.

Simply put we need more positive stories like this one. We can't be all "doom and gloom" and assume that every autistic person's story is going to have a sad ending. That's not how we are supposed to live our lives. We can't live in fear. We can't keep expecting the worst case scenario to keep playing out in our lives. The bad days that autistic people have in their lives probably won't be as bad as the bad days that those who take care of them will be. It can be stressful for these caretakers and it is stressful.

If you are a parent of a child who has autism, it is in the best interest of the entire family not to get discouraged. Will you have your challenges in dealing with autistic topics such as sensory issues? Yes, you will. However, in the single life that you live you have to be willing to adapt. As they always say, "Roll with the punches". If you're not willing to roll with the punches and adjust your lifestyle to accommodate your autistic child, then you will be doing the whole family an injustice.

Don't see your relationship with your autistic child as a "badge of shame" that you're forced to wear every day. There is no shame involved when it comes to having an autistic family member. It is easy to get discouraged today in a world where many, many, many (I put emphasis on that word intentionally) people want to see you fail and fall flat on your face. Let your relationship with an autistic family member be a positive experience, and also a learning experience for others to observe and hopefully replicate.

2 comments: